History

History

The Omnibus

The Omnibus

After the newly formed United States had recovered from the American Revolution, more and more settlers were attracted to the Boston Peninsula. To accomodate this ever increasing population, ambitious land filling projects were undertaken. Bridges were also being built to nearby surrounding towns, later to be called suburbs. As the Town of Boston's land area increased, people could no longer walk from one end of their community to another. The time was opportune for profitable omnibus service to connect Boston to such towns as Roxbury, East Cambridge, Charlestown, and other nearby communities.

In Boston itself, public transportation had its start with two different types of horse drawn vehicles. During 1793, the first stagecoach operation was started between Boston and Cambridge over the West Boston Bridge. During the next fifty years, stagecoaches operated from Boston directly to other cities in New England. However, in the 1820's a new form of local transportation entered the daily scene. This was the so-called omnibus - (OMNI - a bus for all, everywhere). Longer than a conventional stagecoach, it had lengthwise seats along either side rather than cross seats, and a door at either end. Stagecoaches went directly from one city or town; omnibuses made several stops along an assigned route.

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