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Extreme Weather Travel Guide

People with jackets and umbrellas walk past a Green Line trolley

Regardless of the season, it’s our top priority to ensure your safety when you ride the T. When extreme weather does hit, take a look at the guides below to help you stay safe and informed.

Plan Ahead

On the platform in Park Street Station, a woman holds her smartphone with a Green Line train in the background.

Get service alerts via text or email.

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Plan Your Commute

Plan ahead by checking alerts on our website and Twitter.

What to Expect During a Tropical Storm

Route 19 bus inbound for Kenmore

Flooding, heavy winds, and lightning are the main causes for delays and disruptions to MBTA service during major storms.

On rare occasions, the Governor may issue a state of emergency or travel ban, which can impact the level of MBTA service available. If this happens, we will update our website and Twitter with related service changes.

Impacts to Service

We’re working to minimize service disruptions due to rising sea levels and stronger, more frequent major storms by identifying vulnerabilities and updating at-risk infrastructure.

Learn more about our climate change efforts


What to Expect During Extreme Heat

Pedestrians cross the newly repainted crosswalk at Coolidge Corner (August 2019)

On summer’s hottest days, we may operate trains at reduced speeds in some areas to compensate for heat-related stress on the tracks, which could result in slightly longer travel times.

We’ll also have crews stationed around the system to provide assistance.

Learn more about keeping cool in the heat


What to Expect During Slippery Rail Conditions

A Commuter Rail train stopped at the Providence-bound platform.

When leaves fall on Commuter Rail tracks in the fall, they collect with debris, pick up moisture, and then are crushed by train wheels. This creates a condition called slippery rail, or a slick film of leaves on the tracks.

When this happens, trains are required to begin braking for stops sooner and take more time to pick up speed when departing a station, which can cause delays.

Plan Ahead

On the platform in Park Street Station, a woman holds her smartphone with a Green Line train in the background.

Get service alerts via text or email.

Check alerts